Dorkus Malorkus

aphonik's Profile Page

 

I vote cocktail.

I vote cocktail.

Sadly Target has no Halloween mugs this year so I have to fill the void with yet more Halloween socks.

Sadly Target has no Halloween mugs this year so I have to fill the void with yet more Halloween socks.

Needed some Halloween socks to get myself into the holiday spirit. At least until I get home and realize they don’t fit, which is almost always the case with novelty socks. But I persist.

Needed some Halloween socks to get myself into the holiday spirit. At least until I get home and realize they don’t fit, which is almost always the case with novelty socks. But I persist.

Here’s an update on this bottle for those of you who may be interested. The crack team at O.P. Anderson did some great research for me and I now know that this bottle is not aquavit at all, it’s vodka—Absolut Vodka to be exact. Here’s their reply in full: “The bottle dates back to late 1890s or early 1900s as you suggest. It is probably the bottle of unflavoured schnapps  vodka) not aquavit. On the torn label you are able to see the last part of the word BRÄNNVIN and this was simply translated to BRANDY.
It is a fact that O.P. Anderson & Son acquired the label “Absolut rent brännvin” from the company L.O. Smith in Sweden and sold it under their own label as “Absolutely Pure Swedish Brandy.” As matter of fact it was the first export of Absolut Vodka and this more than 70 years before the label was launched again in 1979 by AB Vin- & Spritcentralen who took over Absolut Brännvin in 1917.”

Here’s an update on this bottle for those of you who may be interested. The crack team at O.P. Anderson did some great research for me and I now know that this bottle is not aquavit at all, it’s vodka—Absolut Vodka to be exact. Here’s their reply in full: “The bottle dates back to late 1890s or early 1900s as you suggest. It is probably the bottle of unflavoured schnapps vodka) not aquavit. On the torn label you are able to see the last part of the word BRÄNNVIN and this was simply translated to BRANDY.
It is a fact that O.P. Anderson & Son acquired the label “Absolut rent brännvin” from the company L.O. Smith in Sweden and sold it under their own label as “Absolutely Pure Swedish Brandy.” As matter of fact it was the first export of Absolut Vodka and this more than 70 years before the label was launched again in 1979 by AB Vin- & Spritcentralen who took over Absolut Brännvin in 1917.”

Pre-prohibition Russian kümmel bottle.

Pre-prohibition Russian kümmel bottle.

Happy to report that those two pre-prohibition bottles I was coveting the other day are now mine. I primarily wanted the two in the center, the German kümmel (J. Ferd. Nagel Sohne) and Swedish brandy (O.P. Anderson, possibly aquavit), because they’re both in good condition with good levels and intact seals. He wanted me to take all four so I obliged. The Russian kümmel bottle on the right is very interesting but sadly less than half full; the label cites dates in the 1880s with various royal crests, and the partial label on the rear has the name of Smirnoff, Moscow. The four-compartment liqueur bottle on the left is the least interesting because the corks are all exposed and the creme de cacao compartment is open and almost entirely evaporated (what remains is a funky moldy mess and not at all pleasant to look at). No idea of the maker or era on that one, but I strongly suspect the three bottles on the right may be 1890s or so. Needless to say this all makes me very happy.

Happy to report that those two pre-prohibition bottles I was coveting the other day are now mine. I primarily wanted the two in the center, the German kümmel (J. Ferd. Nagel Sohne) and Swedish brandy (O.P. Anderson, possibly aquavit), because they’re both in good condition with good levels and intact seals. He wanted me to take all four so I obliged. The Russian kümmel bottle on the right is very interesting but sadly less than half full; the label cites dates in the 1880s with various royal crests, and the partial label on the rear has the name of Smirnoff, Moscow. The four-compartment liqueur bottle on the left is the least interesting because the corks are all exposed and the creme de cacao compartment is open and almost entirely evaporated (what remains is a funky moldy mess and not at all pleasant to look at). No idea of the maker or era on that one, but I strongly suspect the three bottles on the right may be 1890s or so. Needless to say this all makes me very happy.

I went back and bought that Caldwell’s Old Newburyport Rum circa 1978. I couldn’t resist because these bottles strike me as exceedingly rare as there is no other mention of one (aside from empties) on the Internet that I could easily find. It’s a bit of New England history that I couldn’t pass up. And at 100 proof with a perfect fill level, too.

I went back and bought that Caldwell’s Old Newburyport Rum circa 1978. I couldn’t resist because these bottles strike me as exceedingly rare as there is no other mention of one (aside from empties) on the Internet that I could easily find. It’s a bit of New England history that I couldn’t pass up. And at 100 proof with a perfect fill level, too.

Free ice cream(!) thanks to the @BenJerrysTruck parked outside on Rogers Street. To be enjoyed in lieu of lunch.

Free ice cream(!) thanks to the @BenJerrysTruck parked outside on Rogers Street. To be enjoyed in lieu of lunch.

Holy shit, look at that green color. Pistachio flavored Ecto Cooler cocktails, anyone? (Late 1970s Pistasha pistachio liqueur.)

Holy shit, look at that green color. Pistachio flavored Ecto Cooler cocktails, anyone? (Late 1970s Pistasha pistachio liqueur.)

Enjoying an American Trilogy using roughly contemporary spirits to when this drink was invented (2007, by Michael McIlroy and Richard Boccato at New York’s Little Branch). I used the old-label Wild Turkey 101 rye and a Laird’s Bonded Apple Brandy circa 2005. The 2005 Laird’s is outstanding; I’ve tasted it side-by-side with three other vintages of the bonded stuff and the premium 12-year bottling, and the 2005 compares favorably, in fact surpasses, the 12-year. I’m guessing for whatever reason there was much more age in that 2005 bottle than in bottles since. So here we are with this wonderful and entirely seasonally appropriate Old Fashioned variation, and using historically appropriate spirits (it’s true but I say that with tongue firmly planted in cheek). And because it’s awesome this way I used a few dashes of the one-off @mmbitters Clusterfuck bitters, an accidental combined batch of orange bitters and toasted pecan bitters, since those flavors are perfect for these spirits. Damn it’s good: 1 oz rye (WT 101), 1 oz applejack (Laird’s Bonded), 3 dashes orange bitters (Clusterfuck), brown sugar cube (half-teaspoonful rich demerara syrup), stirred and strained over a large rock, orange garnish.

Enjoying an American Trilogy using roughly contemporary spirits to when this drink was invented (2007, by Michael McIlroy and Richard Boccato at New York’s Little Branch). I used the old-label Wild Turkey 101 rye and a Laird’s Bonded Apple Brandy circa 2005. The 2005 Laird’s is outstanding; I’ve tasted it side-by-side with three other vintages of the bonded stuff and the premium 12-year bottling, and the 2005 compares favorably, in fact surpasses, the 12-year. I’m guessing for whatever reason there was much more age in that 2005 bottle than in bottles since. So here we are with this wonderful and entirely seasonally appropriate Old Fashioned variation, and using historically appropriate spirits (it’s true but I say that with tongue firmly planted in cheek). And because it’s awesome this way I used a few dashes of the one-off @mmbitters Clusterfuck bitters, an accidental combined batch of orange bitters and toasted pecan bitters, since those flavors are perfect for these spirits. Damn it’s good: 1 oz rye (WT 101), 1 oz applejack (Laird’s Bonded), 3 dashes orange bitters (Clusterfuck), brown sugar cube (half-teaspoonful rich demerara syrup), stirred and strained over a large rock, orange garnish.