Dorkus Malorkus

aphonik's Profile Page

 

The guy in front of me stealing a little of the @mountain_goats soul with his infernal digital soul capturing device. (at Somerville Theatre)

The guy in front of me stealing a little of the @mountain_goats soul with his infernal digital soul capturing device. (at Somerville Theatre)

Quick nightcap at Saloon after the Mountain Goats show. They have a drink on the menu called Hybrid Moments, named after the Misfits song, the awesomeness of which is lessened only by the fact that I intended to create a cocktail by that name. Alas. And double alas, since they are out of the ginger syrup to make the drink, so I settled for the Big D instead: OGD 80 proof (boo hiss), Gran Classico, rhubarb syrup, lemon. (at Saloon)

Quick nightcap at Saloon after the Mountain Goats show. They have a drink on the menu called Hybrid Moments, named after the Misfits song, the awesomeness of which is lessened only by the fact that I intended to create a cocktail by that name. Alas. And double alas, since they are out of the ginger syrup to make the drink, so I settled for the Big D instead: OGD 80 proof (boo hiss), Gran Classico, rhubarb syrup, lemon. (at Saloon)

I also bought this 1965 @MITPress book on “New Architecture in Boston” because it’s published by my employer. Again for about a quarter.

I also bought this 1965 @MITPress book on “New Architecture in Boston” because it’s published by my employer. Again for about a quarter.

I went to 5 estate sales today and did not find much but this book of Bergman screenplays from the late 60s is a pretty cool find for a quarter.

I went to 5 estate sales today and did not find much but this book of Bergman screenplays from the late 60s is a pretty cool find for a quarter.

Someone is starting to molt again. It always starts with these adorable black and gray patterns on his forehead.

Someone is starting to molt again. It always starts with these adorable black and gray patterns on his forehead.

Fozzie Bear posing as an old-timey bartender complete with sleeve garters in the original Muppet Movie (1979). This has me pondering a Fozzie-themed mezcal and honey cocktail called the Wocka Wocka Oaxaca.

Fozzie Bear posing as an old-timey bartender complete with sleeve garters in the original Muppet Movie (1979). This has me pondering a Fozzie-themed mezcal and honey cocktail called the Wocka Wocka Oaxaca.

If anyone was curious to know what Chartreuse cost in 1962, here is your answer ($9.39 for green and $8.29 for yellow, then at 86 proof). This from the “Consumers Union report on Wines and Spirits” (aka Consumer Reports).

If anyone was curious to know what Chartreuse cost in 1962, here is your answer ($9.39 for green and $8.29 for yellow, then at 86 proof). This from the “Consumers Union report on Wines and Spirits” (aka Consumer Reports).

Vintage Brooklyn with 1940s Old Overholt rye and 1940s Amer Picon (I couldn’t resist). I made mini portions of the vintage version to taste against the current version, and strangely I prefer the current. The 40s OH bonded rye is lovely, rich and buttery with a caramel nose and a fullness on the front palate that I have to think is the result of 75 years in the bottle. The rye spice rolls in a bit later for a beautiful finish. It’s lovely and complex sipped neat but mixing it with the sweetness of maraschino renders the drink somewhat overly round and flaccid. The antique spirits carry through with a lovely finish but the overall effect in the cocktail is muddle, as if it badly needs a few dashes of bitters. The current version has a brightness and a sharper delineation of flavors, despite considerably less proof. I suspect that some of the alcohol has evaporated from the vintage bottles—I think I need an alcoholometer to test the current proof of the vintage Overholt. This was an interesting experiment with surprising results. I’m sure that tweaking the proportions to better balance the flavors of the vintage spirits would result in a far better drink but I’m not prepared to waste these rare elixirs in the service of that enterprise. I used Ted Haigh’s recipe from “Vintage Spirits & Forgotten Cocktails”: 2 oz rye, .75 oz dry vermouth (Dolin), 2 teaspoons Amer Picon, 2 teaspoons maraschino (Luxardo), stirred and strained.

Vintage Brooklyn with 1940s Old Overholt rye and 1940s Amer Picon (I couldn’t resist). I made mini portions of the vintage version to taste against the current version, and strangely I prefer the current. The 40s OH bonded rye is lovely, rich and buttery with a caramel nose and a fullness on the front palate that I have to think is the result of 75 years in the bottle. The rye spice rolls in a bit later for a beautiful finish. It’s lovely and complex sipped neat but mixing it with the sweetness of maraschino renders the drink somewhat overly round and flaccid. The antique spirits carry through with a lovely finish but the overall effect in the cocktail is muddle, as if it badly needs a few dashes of bitters. The current version has a brightness and a sharper delineation of flavors, despite considerably less proof. I suspect that some of the alcohol has evaporated from the vintage bottles—I think I need an alcoholometer to test the current proof of the vintage Overholt. This was an interesting experiment with surprising results. I’m sure that tweaking the proportions to better balance the flavors of the vintage spirits would result in a far better drink but I’m not prepared to waste these rare elixirs in the service of that enterprise. I used Ted Haigh’s recipe from “Vintage Spirits & Forgotten Cocktails”: 2 oz rye, .75 oz dry vermouth (Dolin), 2 teaspoons Amer Picon, 2 teaspoons maraschino (Luxardo), stirred and strained.

Finally opened my 1940s bottle of original formula Amer Picon. Now that I have a bottle of the current formula I thought it was time to give them a both a taste. Initial impressions are that the new, 42-proof formula, while tasty in its own right, is syrupy with only mild bitter orange notes amid a whole lot of coffee and cola. The original 78-proof stuff has an incredible nose of maple syrup but a surprising amount of surviving bitterness. Pleasantly so, as I assumed 70+ years of bottle maturation might’ve softened the bitterness to an undesirable degree. I’m sure it has changed somewhat over the years but the strong jolt of bitter orange I was hoping for is still unmistakably present. Up next: vintage Picon cocktails. (I’m also pleased that the cork did not crumble. It was soft and fragile and I feared the worst but the wooden skewer method did the trick. Thanks, wooden skewers!)

Finally opened my 1940s bottle of original formula Amer Picon. Now that I have a bottle of the current formula I thought it was time to give them a both a taste. Initial impressions are that the new, 42-proof formula, while tasty in its own right, is syrupy with only mild bitter orange notes amid a whole lot of coffee and cola. The original 78-proof stuff has an incredible nose of maple syrup but a surprising amount of surviving bitterness. Pleasantly so, as I assumed 70+ years of bottle maturation might’ve softened the bitterness to an undesirable degree. I’m sure it has changed somewhat over the years but the strong jolt of bitter orange I was hoping for is still unmistakably present. Up next: vintage Picon cocktails. (I’m also pleased that the cork did not crumble. It was soft and fragile and I feared the worst but the wooden skewer method did the trick. Thanks, wooden skewers!)

Just sold a bunch of old Chartreuse so hey let’s buy more. 1980s Yellow, “21” Brands-era (1985-1989).

Just sold a bunch of old Chartreuse so hey let’s buy more. 1980s Yellow, “21” Brands-era (1985-1989).